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Pages tagged "Maya Beck"


Care about equity? Then let's talk about salary!

main.jpgFrom Ellen Pompeo to Mo’Nique, pay equity is big news right now. I have been following this topic avidly as a young professional who is still learning to believe in her worth and fighting to be paid accordingly. I have had some of these conversations about worth with one of the women I most admire, Jamie Millard. Forever ahead of the curve, Millard  touched on this very same topic in breaking the silence in nonprofit salaries back in 2012. Even now in 2018, the men and women of Hollywood are creating a spreadsheet basically identical to that which Millard  crowdsourced for us YNPs. Because the topic remains fresh, here’s the most recent edition of the Minnesota Nonprofit Salary and Benefits Survey, which has also helped me put my salary and skills in context.

Still, of all the stories of women fighting to receive their worth, the one that most sticks with me is the solidarity of Jessica Chastain and Octavia Spencer. As Chastain  explained on her Twitter: “[Octavia] had been underpaid for so long. When I discovered that, I realized that I could tie her deal to mine to bring up her quote. Men should start doing this with their female costars.”

In the social media circles I frequent, Chastain’s actions were praised as a brilliant show of allyship, solidarity, and feminism in action. She found something concrete to do with her privilege and took action. I have benefitted from similar help here and there, but I would like to see more of this kind of solidarity in the nonprofit world.

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Excellence, top dogs, and underdogs

main.jpgI consider myself progressive, but in an attempt to understand opposing views, I read Science Left Behind by Alex Berezow and Hank Campbell. Instead of placing politics on a left-to-right spectrum, the authors used a triangle to distinguish between liberals, libertarians, progressives, and conservatives. The three points on the triangle were Freedom, which liberals and libertarians most value; Equality or fairness, which progressives most value; and Excellence, which conservatives most value.

Excellence, they said, was made of self-determination and personal initiative. Conservatives want people to be able to excel if they choose and think the best should win. They oppose too much regulation and like competition. At one point, the authors stated that, "We might even begin to make the case that progressives are engaged in an undeclared war on excellence itself."

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Kindness—large and small—and how Minnesota shows it

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I’ve been thinking recently that there are two kinds of kindness: microsocial and macrosocial. I totally made these words up, but hey, I gotta use my philosophy degree for something.

Microsocial kindness is a person-to-person dedication to someone else’s wellbeing: offering someone a ride, sharing food, listening to their woes, bringing them soup when sick, and so on. This kindness is very small-scale, grassroots, and individualized. People tend to save it for their immediate friends and family. It makes sense; there are only so many hours in a day and so much money in your wallet; no one can spend every minute of every day helping others.

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Squirrels of Color, and How to Catch Them

Purple SquirrelsYou know what a purple squirrel is, right?

It’s kind of a joke--a recruiter’s term for an imaginary candidate that fits their open position perfectly. It’s an animal that might exist in reality, but probably not. This candidate is mythically good, impossibly rare, and costly to chase. Some would even say chasing them is a waste of time, that you’re better off training applicants to fit. There’s a lot out there explaining why you shouldn’t chase purple squirrels. I’ll focus on how the search for the perfect candidate affects the recruitment of people of diverse backgrounds, who we’ll be calling “squirrels of color” (SOCs).

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Figure Your S#!t Out Recap

If you’re like me, you’re not entirely sure what you want to be when you grow up.

Maybe you’re not sure if you’re already "grown-up" because something’s still lacking, maybe not sure if you’re taking the right steps towards your image of adulthood, or maybe you want to be something else and plan to never stop growing and moving forward. If any of these situations resonate with you, maybe you need to figure your s#!t out. YNPN-TC has your back. They recently hosted an event to help you do just that.

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